SpringerOpen Newsletter

Receive periodic news and updates relating to SpringerOpen.

This article is part of the series Space-Time Coding and its Applications – Part II.

Open Access Research Article

On the Capacity of Certain Space-Time Coding Schemes

Constantinos B Papadias1* and Gerard J Foschini2

Author Affiliations

1 Global Wireless Systems Research Department, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 791 Holmdel-Keyport Road, Holmdel, NJ 07733, USA

2 Wireless Communications Research Department, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 791 Holmdel-Keyport Road, Holmdel, NJ 07733, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing 2002, 2002:292150  doi:10.1155/S1110865702000811

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://asp.eurasipjournals.com/content/2002/5/292150


Received:30 May 2001
Revisions received:22 February 2002
Published:30 May 2002

© 2002 Papadias and Foschini

We take a capacity view of a number of different space-time coding (STC) schemes. While the Shannon capacity of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channels has been known for a number of years now, the attainment of these capacities remains a challenging issue in many cases. The introduction of space-time coding schemes in the last 2–3 years has, however, begun paving the way towards the attainment of the promised capacities. In this work we attempt to describe what are the attainable information rates of certain STC schemes, by quantifying their inherent capacity penalties. The obtained results, which are validated for a number of typical cases, cast some interesting light on the merits and tradeoffs of different techniques. Further, they point to future work needed in bridging the gap between the theoretically expected capacities and the performance of practical systems.

Keywords:
MIMO systems; space-time coding; Bell labs Layered Space Time (BLAST); space-time spreading (STS); channel capacity; space-time processing (STP); transmit diversity

Research Article